Please…don’t serve me strawberries in January

Please…don’t serve me strawberries in January


But, a dehydrated strawberry?  That one is OK …as long as it was grown organically, grown locally (and fair trade if grown commercially), picked fresh in the peak of summer, and no sulfiltes, color enhancers, or preservatives added.   Oh, and the strawberry should be washed with purified tap water.

Really?  Well, maybe not all are that fussy, but these are the conversations that run through the head of a self-described “locavore.”

Choosy eating is not pompous.   Following this diet requires restriction and discipline.  Picking and choosing to patronize in-season, local food that is grown responsibly is not a convenient task (at least in the U.S.).  Depending on where you live, a January winter might leave you with only squash and carrots as fresh crop choices.  Abiding to this regime is not easy when you walk into a supermarket and see an array of seemingly fresh produce to tempt you. 

The supermarket knows no seasons, as coined from the movie ‘Food, Inc.’

In reality, seeing the produce is not that tempting knowing the destruction involved to get the food to the supermarket.  Plus, the taste is just terrible.  Since when did we assume that a strawberry with a firm white center or a sour blueberry transported from Chili in February was acceptable?  Plucking the fruit weeks before it has an opportunity to ripen naturally on the plant,  so it can endure transportation & handling hardship, just isn’t appealing.  After awhile, the year-round produce starts to look as lackluster as it tastes.

So going locavore has its rewards.  The food is fresher, better-tasting, more nutritious, support local enterprise, and helps our environment because it involves fewer resources to get from soil to plate. Those are enough reasons for me.

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